23.08.2016
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Dissertation news

Dissertation: Dissertation: 27.8. Body composition and molecular reflections of obesity related cardio-metabolic disorders - A cross-sectional and longitudinal study in women (Wiklund)

Time:

27.8.2016 12:00 — 15:00


Location: Seminaarinmaki, Seminarium, S212
MHS Petri Wiklund defends his doctoral dissertation in Sports Medicine "Body composition and molecular reflections of obesity related cardio-metabolic disorders - A cross-sectional and longitudinal study in women”. Opponent Professor Marjo-Riitta Järvelin (Imperial College London, UK) and Custos Professor Shulin Cheng (University of Jyväskylä).

MHS Petri Wiklund defends his doctoral dissertation in Sports Medicine "Body composition and molecular reflections of obesity related cardio-metabolic disorders - A cross-sectional and longitudinal study in women”. Opponent Professor Marjo-Riitta Järvelin (Imperial College London, UK) and Custos Professor Shulin Cheng (University of Jyväskylä).

Abstract

Obesity is a major risk factor for the development of cardio-metabolic disease. Unfortunately, our understanding of the role of adiposity and the molecular mechanisms underlying this relationship is still limited. The purpose of this thesis was to investigate and to identify biomarkers that associate with cardio-metabolic risk in young and middle-aged women and peripubertal girls. The thesis was based on two separate studies: EWI study and Calex family study. The study subjects were 100 overweight and obese women (mean age 41.7 years) from the EWI study, 110 women (mean age 36.1) and 396 peripubertal girls (mean age 11.2 years at baseline) from the Calex family study. Body composition, visceral and ectopic fat, serum metabolomics, and adipose and skeletal muscle transcriptomics were assessed. We first assessed metabolic profiles of adults with metabolic syndrome, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and insulin resistance using a cross-sectional study design. The study revealed a key discriminatory role of circulating branched amino acids for individuals with metabolic disorders. Not only was elevated serum branched-chain amino acid level associated with poor metabolic health, but this was also reflected in subcutaneous adipose tissue gene expression profiles. We then explored whether increased cardio-metabolic risk in adulthood associated with adiposity originates from childhood, and whether the key discriminatory role of serum branched amino acids found in adults exists already in children. We found that children who were of normal weight but had high body fat percent were susceptible to increased cardio-metabolic risk in adulthood. Furthermore, high levels of branched chain amino acids in childhood were predictive of increases in fat mass, triglycerides and cardio-metabolic risk later in life. Overall, these results suggest that branched-chain amino acids are viable biomarkers to assess cardio-metabolic health, and thus provide a rationale for continued investigation of the relationship between branched-chain amino acid metabolism, adipose tissue function, and metabolic health.

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Petri Wiklund

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petri.wiklund@jyu.fi