20.08.2015
Doctoral Dissertation

28.8. HTT Susanna Myllylä (The Jyväskylä University School of Business and Economics, Management)

DrAdmSc Susanna Myllylä defends her doctoral dissertation in Management "Terrains of Struggle. The Finnish Forest Industry Cluster and Corporate Community Responsibility to Indigenous Peoples in Brazil". Opponent Adjunct Professor Tarja Ketola (University of Turku) and custos Professor Tuomo Takala (University of Jyväskylä).The doctoral dissertation is held in Finnish.

Susanna MyllyläDrAdmSc Susanna Myllylä defends her doctoral dissertation in Management "Terrains of Struggle. The Finnish Forest Industry Cluster and Corporate Community Responsibility to Indigenous Peoples in Brazil". Opponent Adjunct Professor Tarja Ketola (University of Turku) and custos Professor Tuomo Takala (University of Jyväskylä).

The doctoral dissertation is held in Finnish.

This multidisciplinary dissertation examines how the Finnish forest industry cluster has fulfilled its corporate community responsibility (CCR) on Brazil’s Atlantic coast with regard to Indigenous stakeholders. Hence the objective is to study what local communities see as significant in CCR. The dissertation consists of an introduction and three articles published in peer-reviewed academic journals. The Finnish forest industry cluster is well established in Brazil: The Swedish-Finnish Stora Enso and the Brazilian Fibria Celulose (formerly Aracruz Celulose) each own 50 percent of their joint corporation, Veracel Celulose in Bahia state. In addition, consultants such as Pöyry, and Metso, which supplies machines and equipment, are involved. The Finnish firms operating in the pulp and paper industry have been entangled to various degrees in the land struggles of the Tupinikim, the Guaraní, and the Pataxó. The firms have taken advantage of delays in registration of Indigenous Territories in their entirety caused by the state’s inefficiency. The research approach is based on knowledge derived from the grassroots rather than starting from the usual top-down perspective. A qualitative research methodology was used, combining case study with the Grounded Theory and field ethnography approaches. A long-term fieldwork was conducted in Brazil, including interviews with multiple actors. Collecting microhistories, “rays from the past,” offers an alternative narrative not only on economic development in Brazil but also on the success stories of the Finnish firms in South America. The case studies were contextualized in Brazilian political economy and Indigenous rights frameworks. Through the prism of the national and international human rights system governing CCR, the performance of the Finnish companies was assessed. Based on the research findings, the study contends that the Finnish forest industry cluster has largely failed to recognize and perform in alignment with a regulatory framework extensively protecting Indigenous rights. The corporate community responsibility has focused on mere philanthropy, which has divided the Pataxó and hence weakened their territorial claims. In order to shift away from the Northern ethos in CCR discourses, the main result of the study is the generation of a “Concentric CCR Roadmap Model” for analyzing and guiding corporate community interaction in the South. Finally, the study introduces the contemporary Latin American development discourses and points the way toward finding other alternative conceptualizations for corporate stakeholder research in the global South contexts.

Keywords: Business ethics, corporate social responsibility, stakeholder, community, legitimacy, multinational corporation, Stora Enso, Veracel, Fibria, Indigenous Peoples, Brazil, Finland

 

Online version of the dissertation: https://jyx.jyu.fi/dspace/handle/123456789/46643

More information

Susanna Myllylä

None

sbmyllyla@gmail.com